Rather than sim­ply liv­ing with stress, learn­ing how to effec­tively mas­ter our stress lev­els and build emo­tional resilience through brain training programs and actions can not only help you feel and per­form bet­ter on a daily basis, but also pro­tect your brain from the long-term dam­ag­ing effects of stress. Here’s how we do it:

  1. Get out there and get some exercise. Stud­ies show that aer­o­bic exer­cise helps build new neu­rons and con­nec­tions in the brain to coun­ter­act the effects of stress. Plus, exercise also promotes good sleep, reduces depression, and boosts your self confidence through the “feel good” hormones called endorphins.
  2. Try and relax! We know it’s easier said than done but relaxation through yoga, meditation, tai chi, a walk around the block, or whatever helps quiet your mind can not only decrease your blood pressure but also help to decrease your metabolism, respiration rate, and muscle tension.
  3. Try socializing!  Ample evi­dence shows that main­tain­ing stim­u­lat­ing social rela­tion­ships is crit­i­cal for both men­tal and phys­i­cal health. Cre­ate a healthy envi­ron­ment, invit­ing friends, fam­ily and even pets to com­bat stress and exer­cise all your brains.
  4. Take control of your situation and stress. There’s strong connections between stress resiliency and psychological empowerment. Empow­er­ing your­self with a feel­ing of con­trol over your own sit­u­a­tion can help reduce chronic stress and give you the con­fi­dence to take con­trol over your brain health.
  5. Be as positive as you can be! How you think about what stresses you can actu­ally make a dif­fer­ence. Sim­ply chang­ing the way you look at cer­tain sit­u­a­tions, tak­ing stock of the pos­i­tive things in your life and learn­ing to live with grat­i­tude can improve your abil­ity to man­age stress and build brain resilience.